Welcome to TEN-CHI DojoMore than 20 years with you!

Welcome to the Aikido Club TEN-CHI

Aikido for adultsUnique technique of teaching allows men, women and children of all ages study aikido.

Aikido for adults

Aikido for kidsMore than twenty years of practice, conduct classes for kids wint age from 6 years old

Aikido for kids

Japanese Language Classes- Conversation skills
- Vocabulary formation
- The study of grammar and hieroglyphic system

Japanese Language Classes

Lessons of Japanese calligraphy- Basic writing skills
- The history of calligraphy
- Acquaintance witn Japanese culture

Lessons of Japanese calligraphy

The annual Aikido summer camp training 2 times a day,
four meals,
various games and beach

The annual Aikido summer camp
» O-sensei

Morihei Ueshiba

The Founder of Aikido.



 
Morihei Ueshiba (Ueshiba Morihei, December 14, 1883 – April 26, 1969) was a martial artist and founder of the Japanese martial art of Aikido. He is often referred to as "the founder" Kaiso or Osensei, "Great Teacher". The son of a landowner from Tanabe, Ueshiba studied a number of martial arts in his youth, and served in the Japanese Army during the Russo-Japanese War. After being discharged in 1907, he moved to Hokkaido as the head of a pioneer settlement; here he met and studied with Takeda Sokaku, the founder of Daito-ryu aiki-jujutsu. On leaving Hokkaido in 1919, Ueshiba joined the Omoto-kyo movement, a Shinto sect, in Ayabe, where he served as a martial arts instructor and opened his first dojo. He accompanied the head of the Omoto-kyo group, Onisaburo Deguchi, on an expedition to Mongolia in 1924, where they were captured by Chinese troops and returned to Japan. The following year, he experienced a great spiritual enlightenment, stating that, "a golden spirit sprang up from the ground, veiled my body, and changed my body into a golden one." After this experience, his martial arts skill appeared to be greatly increased. Ueshiba moved to Tokyo in 1926, where he set up the Aikikai Hombu Dojo. In the aftermath of World War II the dojo was closed, but Ueshiba continued training at another dojo he had set up in Iwama. From the end of the war until the 1960s, he worked to promote aikido throughout Japan and abroad. He died from liver cancer in 1969. As his students made their last calls, he gave his final instructions:
"Aikido is for the entire world. Train not for selfish reasons, but for all people everywhere".